Intention

At the risk of sounding like Stuart Smalley, there is true power in stating intentions out loud (or in writing in this case). It’s widely researched. It’s true. Energy flows where attention goes. But sometimes it sounds cliché, and I want to run in the opposite direction, to push back and resist, to prove I am different. Perhaps it’s a little left over teen angst; I am not sure, but in any case I’m calling bullshit. I am a human being. I am like everyone else. I am connected to the human race on a primal level.

The alternative then is to embrace it. I will embrace my humanness because there is no cure to being human, as one of my favorite teachers used to say. This is my intention for this blog, to connect to others so that we may grow.

I am running my first marathon, (see my first blog for my alcohol-induced agreement to this decision). Simply stating this intention out loud makes it real. Monday was my first day of training, and it was a rest day. I knew I picked a great plan when the first day was to rest. But on the other “running” days my intention for each run this week has been, “I am strong,” on the inhale; “I am fast,” on the exhale.

Clearly, I am not the first, nor the last to take on this race. But throughout this training, I would like to explore how the power of intention and the impact of stating those intentions can be accelerated by allowing others to serve as a witness. I offer the opportunity for us both to enter into an exchange of intentions together. I see you, you see me.

My vision then is to see how this awareness can bring opportunities for transformation. If I put myself out there and state my intention, what will happen? At worst, maybe nothing (although it appears as if science would disagree), so then at best, we radiate.

What is your intention today?

In Lak'ech Ala K'in,
Tiffany

In Lak’ech
Tú eres mi otro yo.
You are my other me.
Si te hago daño a ti,
If I do harm to you,
Me hago daño a mi mismo.
I do harm to myself.
Si te amo y respeto,
If I love and respect you,
Me amo y respeto yo.
I love and respect myself.

Mayan-inspired poem in “Pensamiento Serpentino” (1971) entitled “In Lak’ech” by Luis Valdez

Comments

Rob Andro's picture

Love it. Thanks for sharing Tiffany. I can't wait to read more. Thank you for including us on your journey.
dan royer's picture

Would love to hear more of these kind of thoughts on the experience as you prepare for the marathon.
SaraVH's picture

I, too, am excited to read along as you take on training for your first marathon! Miss you! Kiss you! ;)
Tiffany Dunning's picture

Thanks for reading folks! I appreciate having this forum as an outlet. :) Miss you, kiss you too, Sara!